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MENA region to face shortage of healthcare professionals

Saudi will require approximately 175,000 medical professionals by 2030
MENA region to face shortage of healthcare professionals
Demand for medical professionals in MENA region rising

According to a recent report from Colliers Healthcare Services, the changing context of health systems, the growing burden of chronic diseases, an ageing population, increasing patient expectations and rapid advances in treatment innovation and technology are all affecting the way health services are delivered. This is leading to changes in the human skillsets required to cater to current and emerging healthcare needs of the population. 

Read more: World Bank: Non-communicable diseases a growing threat to Gulf countries’ economies

Based on Colliers’ estimation, Saudi will require approximately 175,000 medical professionals by 2030 and in addition, the demand will be even higher as presently around 232,000 medical staff are expatriates. As a part of the Saudization drive in the healthcare sector, the majority of these jobs must be filled by Saudi Nationals.

Due to the increase in population, which is expected to reach 45 million by 2023, and the requirement for new healthcare facilities, an additional 26,000 to 43,000 beds will be required

In Egypt, around 48,000 new healthcare staff will be required, as per the research.

Egypt has one of the Middle East’s lowest ratios of healthcare workers per capita. Whilst a large number of physicians graduate from Egypt, the number of physicians practicing in the country is very low due to the braindrain of high-quality doctors to the GCC and the Western countries. 

The report further shows in the UAE, there will be a gap of around 15,000 nurses and allied health professionals in Abu Dhabi and 6,000 physicians and 11,000 nurses in Dubai by 2030.

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